Tag Archives: dogs

cheesy dog treats

Making Cheesy Dog Treats

cheesy dog treatsDogs love cheese, so even the most discriminating dog ought to love these cheesy dog treats.  Because they’re homemade and you will choose the ingredients, you know they contain nothing insidious — something you can’t be sure of with commercial treats.  They’re easy to make, too!  Because they’re made with real cheese they add protein to your dogs diet, but they ARE treats: so dispense responsibly.

Ingredients

Continue reading Making Cheesy Dog Treats

Booker Da Brindle-Boxer Steele

  • Intake: 09/18/2017
  • From: Newport Animal Control
    (held there since early July)
  • Age: 1 year (approx.)
  • Weight: approx. 75 lbs

This fit young fellow is energetic, adventurous and up for anything. He’s ready to join your active lifestyle.

Among his favorite things are peeing on inanimate objects, truck riding, and playing with friends. He dislikes snooty folks who won’t pet him (that would be people: he has yet to meet a dog he didn’t like).

Booker is available for adoption through Steele Away Home – Canine Foster and Rescue.

Continue reading Booker Da Brindle-Boxer Steele

Universal K9 Turns Pit Bull Death Row Into 2nd Chance

Universal K9Universal K9 is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization in San Antonio TX and Richmond VA that pulls dogs from kill shelters and rescues and trains them to work with police officers as narcotics dogs, pursuit & take-down dogs, or as dual-purpose dogs.

They also train dogs to work as business drug/explosives/weapons search dogs.  These are useful in airports, jails, schools, oil fields, warehouses, trucking companies, and similar.

They have a special program for veterans on the GI Bill to attend a two week Dual Purpose Handlers course.  All students who complete the course are eligible to receive a FREE single purpose narcotics or explosive dog.

Universal K9 Favors Pit Bulls

Continue reading Universal K9 Turns Pit Bull Death Row Into 2nd Chance

honey as medicine

Using Raw Honey as a Topical Antibiotic

Doug
The dogtor is in

The use of honey as a topical antibiotic has a long history.  In fact, it is considered one of the oldest known wound dressings.  Honey was used by the ancient Greek physician Dioscorides in 50 A.D. for sunburn and infected wounds.  He described honey as being “good for all rotten and hollow ulcers” [1].   Honey’s healing properties are mentioned in the Bible (Prov 24:13), Quran (16.68-69), and Torah.

Wounds infected with Pseudomonas, not responding to other treatment, have been rapidly cleared of infection using honey as a topical antibiotic, allowing successful skin grafting [4], [5].

Honey as a Topical Antibiotic?

Some of the compounds in honey kill certain bacteria and fungus.  This is why honey is the one natural foodstuff that won’t spoil.   No one knows how the bees do that, but we know it works.  When applied to the skin, honey also serves as a barrier to moisture and keeps raw skin from sticking to dressings.  Honey also provides nutrients that speed healing. Continue reading Using Raw Honey as a Topical Antibiotic

Food Guarding In Dogs and How To Deal With It

Dogs tend to protect or “guard” things they feel are most important to them, things they feel they can’t do without.  Some will guard toys, some food, some will “guard” or become vicious when others approach their people.  Guarding is rarely a desirable trait.  Food guarding is dangerous to other dogs and to the people who care for the dog.  It needs to be corrected.

Why Is the Dog Food Guarding?

food guarding
Credit: warrenphotographic.co.uk

Some dogs just have a greedy nature, even (perhaps especially) as a puppy.  They don’t share well.  Working with them as a puppy is needed to correct this early.  Some dogs guard food because they came from an environment where food was scarce and they had to fight for every scrap they got.  Some dogs guard because, although food is plentiful, others steal theirs.

Discovering why the dog guards is the key to undoing the behavior. Continue reading Food Guarding In Dogs and How To Deal With It

Blondie Joins the Fun

Cochise, on DST
Cochise tells the tale

Blondie Bear has been feeling poorly for the past few months: she has the itchies real bad.  She’s gone to see Dr. Sandra a couple of times.  Dr. Sandra gave HairyFace some medicine for Blondie: that helped the itchies but made her sleepy.  Now that the problem is clearing up and Blondie isn’t spending all her time either scratching or sleeping, she is getting to be her spunky self again.  And that means she can be trouble for me sometimes. Continue reading Blondie Joins the Fun

Josie’s Midnight Con

Doug
The dogtor is in

Josie Bean has taken it in her mind that if she gets me up anywhere between 2:00 am and 4:00 am and goes outside that I should give her a stick-treat.  We are in the habit of giving stick-treats to good dogs who go outside after they get up so they are “safe” to let run loose in the house.  But that is after We the People get up, not whenever they decide they need a snack.  She’s trying to con me: and it’s not the first time. Continue reading Josie’s Midnight Con

Doors and Canine Rites of Passage

Cochise, on DST, doors
Cochise tells the tale

Peoples love doors.

They have doors EVERYWHERE.  But doors get in the way of us doggers.  Most of the time, we cannot open these doors and must “request” assistance from the Peoples if we are to pass through.  So we learn signals to alert the Peoples of our need.

I bark.  Just once.  Loud and sharp.  Blondie Bear scratches on the metal part of the door.  We teach these signals to our paduan learner foster dogs, they choose which they prefer.  Or … come up with something of their own.  Many start out with sitting on the porch staring at the door, willing it to open.

That doesn’t work. Continue reading Doors and Canine Rites of Passage

Giving People Medicine to Your Dog

Benedryl uses and dose diphenhydramine
Click to enlarge

If your dog has mild allergies, you can treat them with over the counter medications intended for humans (people medicine) and avoid the risks and cost of prescription drugs like Prednisone.

There are a number of reasons you might want to give your dog Benedryl (diphenhydramine – also available in many generic brands).   Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine, so it helps in relieving itching from contact allergies or bug bites or stings.  It can be used to reduce swelling and pain from a snake bite.  It will calm a hyperactive dog or reduce “terrors” during fireworks or thunderstorms.

The usual dosage of Diphenhydramine for dogs is 1 mg per pound of dog every 8 to 12 hours (two to three times daily), but a single dose can be doubled to 2mg/lb if needed in an emergency such as a snake bite. This suggested dose is for formulations containing the active ingredient diphenhydramine only — NO Tylenol. Tylenol (acetaminophen) is poisonous to dogs.  Overdosing on diphenhydramine for an extended period can be lethal, but there is a wide margin of safety.

If you need something stronger, Cetirizine (Zyrtec) and Loratadine (Claratin) are also safe for canine use and available in affordable generic forms. Continue reading Giving People Medicine to Your Dog

What is This “Rescue”?

I work at the Humane Society of Jefferson County.  It’s what some people call an “animal shelter” but I avoid that term when I can because of the negative connotations that come with that term.  It is, however, a place where a large number of animals are housed in minimal accommodations.  My coworkers and I work very hard, every day, to keep their living spaces clean and healthy.  All animals are vaccinated upon entry, watched closely for signs of disease, and medicated as necessary for their recovery.  Euthanasia is a last resort, and not taken lightly.  Due to the diligence of our management, euthanizing for lack of space is a rare occurrence (as in “it has been years since it happened.”)

In the past week or two, visitors to H.S.J.C. have seen tags reading “Going to Rescue” on the doors of many animal’s crates or runs.  Some ask what that means.  A few complain that they want to adopt an animal so tagged: why can’t they adopt if the animal is right here? Continue reading What is This “Rescue”?