Tag Archives: behavior

Josie says, “Come with me, come with me!”

I was working at my desk late this morning.  Josephine came in and did her little eye-batting, butt wiggle, nose whistle thing that she does when she wants me to go with her to accomplish something: open the door so she can go out, come to the dining room because dinner is ready and they’re waiting on me, or look at something she’s trying to tattle-tale about.  So I got up and followed her out of the room.

But she went right past the laundry room — where the door to outside is — going straight on.  She glanced back over her shoulder with those big eyes of hers to be sure I was still in tow, tail swinging madly when she saw I was.  She danced into the kitchen, bore to the right and stopped in front of the stove.

Two trays of fresh-baked dog treats just begging to be sampled!

“They’re cool now Doug. Time for SAMPLES!”
“Right you are darlin, right you are.”

Where Your Treasure Lies

You have heard it said that money is the root of all evil: that is incorrect.  Money, wealth, possessions themselves are not evil, but the pursuit of these things: greed, spawns evil.  For where our treasure lies, here also will be our heart.

What is treasure?

treasure chest gold jewelry wealthThe traditional image of treasure  being chests of coins and jewels is a little archaic for a modern discussion of this topic.  Today’s treasure tends to be comprised of things like a fat bank account (modern-day equivalent of a chest of coins), a big fancy home, a snazzy car, a killer wardrobe, and all the latest tech toys.  When taken individually they may not seem terribly imposing, but when taken en masse they can indicate a problem.

The real question becomes one of want vs need and where your focus lies.  Matthew 6 says: Continue reading Where Your Treasure Lies

Fine, Just Fine

I inwardly cringe as I walk up the steps to the door.  Just inside I am met by a large fellow with a round, ruddy face.  He smiles broadly, “Well hey there, Doug, how you doing?” and sticks his hand out.  I wonder for a moment what would happen if I told him how I’m doing – but immediately dismiss that.  I’ve seen it before. I’d tell him about my concern and that would open the door to a rebuttal involving a litany of atrocities that make my ailments seem penny-ante indeed. So I shake his hand and say, “Fine, just fine.”  I deliberately leave off the expected, “and you?”  We will just leave that door closed.   We smile at one another and move in divergent directions.

This exchange is repeated a half-dozen times before I locate a spot that is the slack-water of the room where I can be present, but out of the way.  Not hiding, but not easily accessible either. Continue reading Fine, Just Fine

The Rise of the Brotherhood of the Beagle

Cochise, on DST
Cochise tells the tale

Buddy Beagle has to wear an e-collar to keep him from licking wounds.  Josie Beagle is playful and inventive.

It didn’t take Josie long to decide the velcro strap that holds Buddy’s e-collar closed made a good toy to tug on, especially since the velcro unzipping makes a wonderful ripping sound.

So one afternoon, HairyFace went out to the yard to check on The Beagles and was shocked to find: Continue reading The Rise of the Brotherhood of the Beagle

Food Guarding In Dogs and How To Deal With It

Dogs tend to protect or “guard” things they feel are most important to them, things they feel they can’t do without.  Some will guard toys, some food, some will “guard” or become vicious when others approach their people.  Guarding is rarely a desirable trait.  Food guarding is dangerous to other dogs and to the people who care for the dog.  It needs to be corrected.

Why Is the Dog Food Guarding?

food guarding
Credit: warrenphotographic.co.uk

Some dogs just have a greedy nature, even (perhaps especially) as a puppy.  They don’t share well.  Working with them as a puppy is needed to correct this early.  Some dogs guard food because they came from an environment where food was scarce and they had to fight for every scrap they got.  Some dogs guard because, although food is plentiful, others steal theirs.

Discovering why the dog guards is the key to undoing the behavior. Continue reading Food Guarding In Dogs and How To Deal With It

Jasper and Give

Play Time with Jumping Jasper

This update on Jasper will not be especially impressive to anyone who is not familiar with Jasper because play time with him now looks much like any other dog. But to those who know him, this example will bring a smile to your face.

Jasper watching intently ready to playJasper was sent to us because no one could manage him. He was just over-the-top energetic. He was being playful, not mean, but when a larger dog puts a certain level of energy into play, there is little apparent difference to the recipient of his affections. He jumped on people, he pawed them, clawed them, mouthed (gentle biting) them, sometimes tearing clothing, breaking jewelry, and leaving scratches on skin. And worst of all, he could not be deterred! If you defended yourself, he thought you were playing and ramped up the play efforts. Telling him to stop or get down were totally ineffective: he paid no mind to anyone.  He had no idea what those words meant. Continue reading Play Time with Jumping Jasper

NASCAR

Canine Toenail Trimming

I did some toenail trimming on all the dogs yesterday. Trimming a dog’s nails is a necessary part of caring for them.  Sharp claws are a hazard to you and your belongings, claws that push down on the floor as they walk can be painful to your dog.  For both your sakes, keep them trimmed.

Cochise is always cooperative: he’s a good boy. Blondie did well too. She has gotten to where I ask, “May I have your paw” and she will lift a front paw and present it for trimming. She does expect the treat after each snip or two, but she sits still. Her hind feet are a little trickier (she’s ticklish) but that went well too.

Offering treats during toenail trimming does not work for Volt besubmits to toenail trimmingcause he gets so excited by the prospect of food. I waited until Volt was napping, then sidled in with the nippers and said, “Volt … buddy … may I trim these toenails?”

Volt said, “Hmmm? What? Yeah, sure … whatever.”

Volt got several treats when the session was done.

So they’re all trimmed up and looking spiffy.  We do this about every two weeks.

Toenail Trimming Treats

To attain even Blondie Bear’s cooperation (she was once terrified of toenail trimming) I make treats by slicing hot dogs into wheels about 1/4″ thick, spreading them on a paper towel so they don’t touch, and microwaving them for 3 minutes (that will vary depending on your microwave). Raw ones work too, but raw hot dog bits go bad quickly (sometimes in just hours). These cooked (dried) bits will keep for days if you want to use them in a training treat pouch. Longer if you store the pouch in the fridge when you’re not using it. I learned this trick from a book about fictional dog trainer Raine Stockton written by Donna Ball.

To start with, sit down and call the dog over. When she complies, give her a treat. Let her sniff the clippers. Give her a treat. Repeat that a couple of times, so she associates the clipper with pleasure. Snip one nail, give a treat. Be firm, but don’t turn it into a wrestling match. Reward her liberally with treats but only when she complies in some way. Bribery (treats before the fact) does not work on dogs: they’re too smart for that.

Why Good Dogs Develop Bad Behavior

Doug
The dogtor is in

Jasper has been with us for a week now. He came to us from the local animal shelter because he had been returned to them from a rescue because his bad behavior was deemed “unmanageable”. I was told this meant that he is extremely energetic, jumps on people and cannot be dissuaded from this. This is bad behavior in a small dog, in one that is around 70 pounds, it can prove terrifying to an unsuspecting recipient of such affection. And he does mean it as affection or play.

Jasper exhibiting good behavior not bad behavior
Jasper doesn’t look like a terrorist does he?

This description immediately popped a couple of presupposition flags in my mind:

1) It seems this behavior is often the result of a family adopting a puppy but making no attempt to train it. While it’s an adorable ball of fluff, jumping up on your legs eager for attention is cute. When it becomes a 30 pound dog, it’s less endearing. When it’s 50 or more pounds, the poor dog ends up at the local shelter because it’s a major nuisance and “they can’t do anything with it”. So of course this bad behavior is the dog’s fault.  The truth is that no one took the effort to teach it good behavior. Continue reading Why Good Dogs Develop Bad Behavior

Jasper is ready to ride

The Importance of Pack Order

Doug
The dogtor is in

We have been contacted by several families in the past year because they adopted a dog that we fostered and trained. We gave a good report on the dog as being non-aggressive. The rescue that handled the adoption also saw no sign of aggression. So why, all of a sudden, is the dog getting aggressive with the family that just wants to give it a great home and lavish love on him? Continue reading The Importance of Pack Order

10 Crate Training Tips for Your Dog

crate training
This silly Snoozer is obviously comfortable with his crate.

When used properly, crate training provides you and your dog with multiple benefits. For you it provides a simple, effective means of restricting your dog when you cannot provide close supervision. If your dog is an explorer, he may get into things that will harm him. If she’s a chewer, your home may suffer from allowing her to roam unsupervised. Crating also helps with housebreaking because a dog has a natural aversion to soiling its own sleeping space.

For your dog crate training offers a safe haven, a room or space of his own. It is a familiar place. Whether you go on the road or just move around a large home, having a place of his own brings your dog a feeling of safety. If your dog is ill or just been spayed or neutered, a familiar crate is quite comforting. A crate is effective in combating separation anxiety or fear of a thunderstorm because of the snug, safe feeling an enclosed crate can provide.

Continue reading 10 Crate Training Tips for Your Dog