For My Fellow Lexophiles (Lovers Of Words):

The following plays on words (puns) have been around the internet for some time.  I cannot claim any of them as original (mine), only collected here for your enjoyment.
 
  1. A bicycle can’t stand alone; it is two tired.
  2. A will is a dead giveaway.
  3. Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana.
  4. A backward poet writes inverse.
  5. In a democracy it’s your vote that counts; in feudalism, it’s your Count that votes.
  6. A chicken crossing the road: poultry in motion. Continue reading “For My Fellow Lexophiles (Lovers Of Words):”

Frozen Yogurt Dog Treats Recipe

It’s (almost) summer time again and the heat of summer will be upon us once again.  Your fur-friends don’t like the heat any more than you do, so as a special treat on those hot days, try making up a batch of these.

Makes 30-40 Cubes or around 12 Dixie cups

Ingredients:

4 cups yogurt, plain
½ cup creamy peanut butter (Xylitol free of course!)
2 tablespoons honey
1 ripe banana, mashed

Directions:

frozen yogurt dog treats
Dixie cup version

Melt the peanut butter in a microwave for about 30 seconds.

Place all of the ingredients into a blender, mixer or food processor and mix until smooth.

Pour into ice cube trays or Dixie cups – depending on size of dog(s).
Freeze until firm.

Pop out of the tray (you may need a table knife if using an ice cube tray) or peal the paper cup away and let your dog enjoy this frozen treat!

 

Dog Park Update

Stanley Fencing Crew, dog parkFor the past three days we have been hosting an installation crew from Stanley Fencing Inc. in Sevierville TN. In a previous post I described what we hoped to do and asked for help with the cost: we just didn’t have enough to cover the cost – and we want to get it done before winter.

The response was heart-warming. A batch of fellow dog lovers stepped up and offered generous gifts. In just 5 days following the posting of our request, we had covered our deficit and had scheduled the fence company to do the installation. They started work on Wednesday and got all the posts in and some of the top rail on.

dog park fencing going inOn Thursday they came back to hang the chain-link and install gates. They ran into a couple of Oopsies: and an opportunity to show off their customer service.

  1. The fella who counts out parts and bags them up for each job shorted the job 10 tension straps, so they cannot properly install the final run of mesh. Their business is too far away to have these guys to go after more.
  2. The fella who welds up gates made one too small and it doesn’t fit. This will take some time, so they would have to come back again anyway: might as well do it all in one trip.

Continue reading “Dog Park Update”

Josephine Goes to Summer Camp

Marie and I are a foster home for dogs.  We often develop attachments to our charges (the dogs) and have to fight back tears as we send them off to new homes.  Some are harder than others, but we’ve learned to deal with that.  Well, mostly.

After her first bath

Josephine was especially hard, in part because she is still so timid.  She’s come a long ways from the terrified creature we took out of the shelter so she could find some peace and so we could work on her fear of people.

She had a health issue too, which we addressed with our veterinarian.  When her treatment was complete and she had settled down to where she could meet new people, we began soliciting for a forever home for her. Continue reading “Josephine Goes to Summer Camp”

Avoiding Regret and Repentance

regret sorrow misgivingsWe all experience regret over things we’ve said and done – or didn’t say or do when we should have. The Bible says that if we repent of our wrong-doings, God is swift to forgive us. People may not be so swift to forgive, so it is best to avoid doing things that cause anguish in the first place.

Regret vs. Repentance

Regret is a feeling of sorrow over something we’ve done.  Our regret may be over the knowledge that we have inadvertently hurt someone, or it may be over the fact that we got caught doing something we thought we’d get away with.  Either way regret is sorrow, but not necessarily knowing that we were wrong in doing something.  In fact we may feel regret now, but if the opportunity arises again, we may well do it again because we still feel we had the “right” to do whatever we did … we’ll just be more careful not to get caught. Continue reading “Avoiding Regret and Repentance”

The Puppygate Affair

gates beforeI’ve been working at the Humane Society of Jefferson County for just over 3 months.  In the puppy room we have 8 inside/outside runs.  There are chain link gates at either end and a sliding door in the wall that separates the inside from the outside.  Outside the gates are  7 feet or so tall, inside, two runs have tall walls and gates (for jumpers) the rest have 3 foot high walls and gates.  Two of these short runs had really sad gates on the inside.  The bottom rails rusted completely away and fell off, leaving an oddly shaped door that was augmented by zip-tieing cat crate doors to the chain link to fill the growing gap between door and post.

I award points to my fellow staffers for ingenuity, but these were difficult to open and only going to degrade further.  They did not present the best image of our facility either (they were ugly).  It’s time to do something more permanent about this.  So I took it upon myself to properly fix them. Continue reading “The Puppygate Affair”

What is This “Rescue”?

I work at the Humane Society of Jefferson County.  It’s what some people call an “animal shelter” but I avoid that term when I can because of the negative connotations that come with that term.  It is, however, a place where a large number of animals are housed in minimal accommodations.  My coworkers and I work very hard, every day, to keep their living spaces clean and healthy.  All animals are vaccinated upon entry, watched closely for signs of disease, and medicated as necessary for their recovery.  Euthanasia is a last resort, and not taken lightly.  Due to the diligence of our management, euthanizing for lack of space is a rare occurrence (as in “it has been years since it happened.”)

In the past week or two, visitors to H.S.J.C. have seen tags reading “Going to Rescue” on the doors of many animal’s crates or runs.  Some ask what that means.  A few complain that they want to adopt an animal so tagged: why can’t they adopt if the animal is right here? Continue reading “What is This “Rescue”?”

Josephine – Notes on a foster dog

Josephine first came to our attention when the Humane Society of Jefferson County posted an urgent plea for rescue or foster of a female beagle mix who was so terrified by the “shelter” environment that she was at risk.  My wife, Marie, decided we needed to help this poor thing.  After some communication through Facebook, we drove out to pick her up for fostering.

Age: Approximately 9 months (as of May 2017).

History: Picked up as a stray by Animal Control in April.  She was terrified of everything.  The shelter environment only made that worse. She was placed into foster care to give her a peaceful environment and to work on her fear issues.

Health: Initially, her health was quite poor: the vet wasn’t sure she would survive.  By the time she came here her health was much improved except for a fungal skin condition brought on by anxiety, which is being treated.  She has been spayed, wormed,  and is current on vaccinations.

Personality: Once she calmed down she has become a playful, spunky, silly, lovable girl.  She craves attention (loves a gentle belly rub) and seeks it from people she trusts.  Josie is friendly and playful with all of our dogs, even those 3 times her size!  She is fearless and open with all of them. Continue reading “Josephine – Notes on a foster dog”

Julian – Notes On a Rescue Dog

Julian

When I first met Julian, he was sitting in an outside pen at the Humane Society where I work.  He was a mess.

Julian had been picked up by animal control because a resident called to report a dog fight.  I don’t have details about exactly what happened or what became of the other dog, but Julian got chewed up pretty badly, especially his head.  We were giving him antibiotics to fight infection and help his wounds heal.

He was sitting, with his feet all bunched up, on a toilet seat cover.  Someone gave us a bunch of them to use as comfies — we use them mostly for cats in their wall crates.  But here was this 60 pound boxer bunched up on this woolly toilet seat cover like it was the best thing in the world: an oasis of comfort in an otherwise miserable existence.   It was funny and heart breaking at the same time.

Over the weeks, Julian began to mend and he proved to be gentle and friendly when we worked with him.

Then we tested him for heartworm … and the test came up positive.  Our boss wasn’t surprised: Julian had obviously been neglected and allowed to run loose.  It was no shock to find he was not on a preventative.  She said the best thing to do was to put him down.  With his scars and the HW+ there was no way he was going to get adopted, and we don’t have the facilities to treat his HW anyway. Continue reading “Julian – Notes On a Rescue Dog”

Tails of Woe

Axel

I’ve been working at the Humane Society in a neighboring county for about a month and a half. It’s hard work in a couple of ways. A large part of what I do is cleaning up after the animals. There is a lot of work to do and it has to be done before they open to the public, so it is fast paced work as well. It’s physically demanding and I come home tired.

It is also psychologically hard.  I like working with the animals. I know I should not get attached because most of them will not be there long: they’ll be adopted or sent out on rescue. Keeping them around a long time is actually bad because this is (of necessity) a kill shelter, although they work hard to keep euthanasia to a bare minimum.

When I started working there, there was a little pit bull named “Freddie”. He was bright, and friendly, and even as a new employee he never objected to my coming into his pen to clean or work with him. He was obviously a favorite with all the staff. Everyone loved Freddie. He looked a bit like Gator, one of my foster dogs at the time.

We put Freddie down last week. Continue reading “Tails of Woe”