Piney Mountain Foster Care

Canine Foster and Rescue

Cutting the Cost of Heartworm Prevention

Originally published July 14, 2015

Doug

The dogtor is in

Heartworms are a serious threat to dogs. The heartworm larvae are carried and transmitted by mosquitoes: mosquitoes are everywhere, even in our home at times. Keeping your dog from being bitten by a mosquito is almost impossible, therefore heartworm prevention is important to keep the heartworm larvae from developing in your dog’s blood stream.

Heartworm prevention medications can be pricey since they need to be given every month, year round. One very popular brand is Heartguard: a chewable treat for your dog. It is reliable and well liked by veterinarians and dogs alike. Pet Armor is the same formula but is less expensive. If that is still too much for your budget, there is another option. (more…)

Cleaning Your Dog’s Ears

Dogs, like people, get ear wax build up.  This alone can cause pain, decreased hearing, and dizziness.  But add to that the increased risk of a yeast infection, bacterial infection and even parasites in the ear and you can see that inspecting and maintaining your dog’s ears is important to their overall health.  This is especially important for dogs with floppy ears.

Ear Anatomy

A dog’s ear canal is L shaped with a vertical canal that connects to a horizontal canal deeper withing the skull.  Dirt, wax, and parasites such as ear mites can hide in the horizontal canal.  We cannot access that canal, so we need to use regular flushing to remove debris that may cause a blockage. We also don’t want to risk damaging the tympanum by poking implements such as Q-tips down there.

How Often?

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Homemade Disinfectants for Animal Crates

Crate training a dog is an important part of housebreaking a dog.  But a crate can become unhealthy if it is not cleaned out regularly and disinfected occasionally.

You will start by laundering the bedding regularly — how often depends on how clean your dog stays, whether he eats in his crate, and if he leaks urine when he gets excited.  If he wets his bedding, wash it right away.  If he’s a messy eater, every few days.  If he’s a tidy boy and you just need to get the funky smell out, every 10 days to two weeks works well.

Be sure to launder plush toys too.  Hard toys can be washed in a sink of soapy water, add just a dash of bleach for better disinfecting.  Rinse thoroughly.

When it comes to the crate itself, here are some general purpose cleaners you can make up at home. (more…)

Baby Food to the Rescue

Rebel has not been eating since he arrived here almost a week ago.  He was too skinny then, and worse now.  I’ve tried several varieties of dry kibble, canned dog food, and various combinations of rice, premium canned dog food, chicken soup, and milk.  Nothing tempted him … except one.  A small tub of chicken in gravy cat food that I had on hand.  That he he licked clean and wanted to eat the lid.  But it came back up an hour later.  And the vomit was bright yellow: that’s bile and indicates a stomach problem.

I’m taking Rebel to the vet in a few minutes so, of course, he decides to eat this morning.  I tried him on one baby food hot dog (they’re labeled as “meat sticks”) and he scarfed it.  I gave him the rest of the jar (minus the oil they were packed in) and he scarfed those.  To make a proper meal would take 6 or 8 jars – which I didn’t have and wouldn’t do anyway.  Better to stay with a small meal that stays down (and it did) than to stuff him and have it all come back up.

So, what changed?  I’m afraid I did not hold to the scientific method at all here because I changed several things all at once.

  1. I brought him inside the house yesterday afternoon and let him over-night in a crate.   My thinking was that he may be feeling lonely outside by himself since I take his two outside companions in the shop and crate them at night.  They don’t do well in the cold.  It wasn’t cold last night, but they’re accustomed to going to bed at night.   Rebel did well in his crate, waking me only once at 3:00 because he needed to go out and pee.
  2. This was his first time on the baby food  meat sticks.  These were recommended to me by another rescue person, so I picked up a jar as part of an assortment of foods to try.
  3. I have been using a stainless steel bowl for his food.  I feed all of the foster dogs in stainless steel and wash each dish after every meal.  I don’t remember whether Rebel’s bowl at “home” was ceramic or plastic, but it wasn’t stainless.  So I got out a hard plastic bowl and tried that this morning.

Which of these –or maybe some combination — broke through his resolve I cannot say.  But he ate a little bit this morning and I’m glad of that.  We’ll see what Doc Sandra says and go from there.

At The Vet

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Progress Notes: Oct 7, 2018

We’ve taken in two new pack members this week, and are planning another facilities upgrade.

Low Rider

Seriously? Don’t you have a harness that fits?

I picked up Low Rider on Tuesday.  She went straight into a crate in my workshop for several reasons.

  • She was infested with fleas.  We work hard to keep fleas out of our home, so that has to be dealt with before she can come anywhere near our other dogs.
  • She is fearful.  She’s obviously been abused and is frightened of new people, insects, falling leaves, and the outdoors in general.  But not dogs: she ran right up to Ugg and Lady and said howdy to each.  She’s only comfortable in a crate and prefers a quiet environment to herself.  The workshop is perfect now that it’s not so hot every day.  I can run my big turbo fan in front of a window and keep it tolerable in there.
  • She would not walk on a leash.  If used with a collar, she’d drop and gator-roll trying to get away from it.  A harness works better, but it has to be removed when she goes back into her crate or she’ll chew it up.  We lost a $30 Walk-Rite harness learning that lesson.  The next smallest harness I had was a poor fit, but it served the purpose while I ordered more harnesses.

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The De-Bageling of Buddy the Beagle Boy

Almost three months ago this sweet, loving, senior Beagle was attacked by three large dogs and torn to shreds. The skilled hands at Cedarwood Veterinary Hospital stitched him back together, with little hope that he would survive. But survive he did!

The last of his injuries to heal up has been a triangular patch on his rump where the skin was torn away and lost.

Click the thumbnails to enlarge each picture

Outline shows original missing skin.

Scar tissue cutting in under granulation (lump).

After granulation removed

Progress by October 10th.

All of the time since he came out of surgery, he has been wearing an e-collar: Cedarwood used a cone, but we switched to an inflatable Kong collar when he came here for recovery care. (more…)

Buddy Beagle’s Lumpectomy

Cochise, on DST

Cochise tells the tale

Our pal, Buddy Beagle went to Cedarwood Veterinary Hospital this morning for a follow-up appointment.

honey as a topical antibiotic

The wound when he arrived here.

He’s had a hemispherical lump growing in the gash that HairyFace has been tending. The gash was healing nicely: skin closing over the exposed flesh, no infection (thanks to a honey of a new treatment). By this morning just a small crack was left and the lump standing proud. We all hoped the skin would climb up over the lump and the lump would eventually be reabsorbed into his body. But that wasn’t happening. In fact, the skin was digging in under the lump.

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Buddy Beagle says “Life Is Better With a Donut”

Cochise, on donut collars

Cochise tells the tale

Everyone likes eating a donut, but have you ever tried wearing one? When Buddy Beagle came here, he was wearing one of those lampshade cone e-collars. That was to keep him from licking or chewing at his many wounds, and it did its job admirably. But it did make life cumbersome.

While he was in intensive care at Cedarwood Animal Hospital, the cone was a bother, but he wasn’t involved in as much activity as he is allowed here, so it was fine.

Why a Cone is Bad

He hated the cone and he let the Peoples know about it. (more…)

Intensive Care for Cheyanne

Today Cheyanne went in for her final step in the medication for heart worm treatment: the second injection deep into her back muscles. The vet tech tells me that these injections are not very painful, so the dog is not sedated for each procedure, but the aftermath is. Cheyanne is in enough pain now that they sent some medication for that as well. Not all dogs require that, but Cheyanne is “delicate”. She’s more sensitive to cold than the rest as well.

Cheyanne, nice warm shirtIt’s cold today: 12° this morning, 22° as a high. After spending the day in the intensive care room at the shelter for her procedure and observation, I put her in an old Tee shirt when she came home and needed some leg stretching time. She seemed to appreciate that. She appreciated getting the breakfast she was deprived of this morning even more.

She seemed dazed and disoriented. She spent a long time just sitting on the boardwalk. It is not at all like her to be so still. When I called her to come inside where it’s warm, she turned and went to her dog house instead. “It’s too cold for that sweetie.” I had to carry her inside. I put an extra blanket in her crate for added cushioning on her sore little body. She curled up and went to sleep.

Marie and I decided it would be best to put Cheyanne into intensive care for a couple of days to be sure she was OK. Blondie and Cochise agreed and gave permission for her to sleep in their house for a couple of nights. (more…)

Heartworm Treatment Begins for Cochise

Cochise dogs sick heartworm treatment foster dog programHello again, Cochise here. You may recall that HairyFace & NiceLady are fostering me while I undergo heartworm treatment. We’ve spent the past month and a half preparing for me to receive these treatments. It has been quite an adjustment for me as I learned to live a civilized life and for them as they prepare to care for me while I undergo the heartworm treatment. I understand it can be rough.

Accommodations

dog foster program heartworm CochiseWhen I arrived here, I started out staying exclusively in the Guest Quarters my People set up for foster dogs: a 10×10 chain-link pen with a cabin style dog house. But I managed to wheedle my way into their hearts and they decided to let me come inside the house with them; on occasion. Because I’m so adorable, these occasional indoor visits have turned into full time. I have one room of my own (they call it a crate) in the house and one in HairyFace’s office. This is partly because it has been so hot, they felt it would be bad for me to be left out in the heat while I’m so sick to start with. And partly because I’m very good at making a pitiful, “I’m seeick” face (see above) that just melts their hearts. (more…)